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Living Future '11 - Panel Discussion: Building Material Reuse: Understanding the Challenges, Celebrating the Successes, and Providing the Tools

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April 13, 2011
With increasingly limited resources and a growing awareness around sustainable stewardship, material reuse represents one of the ultimate forms of resource conservation. It not only provides a vision of how to live more sustainably, it can also be economically pragmatic and nurture a community. Such principles overlap greatly with the goals of certification standards like the Living Building Challenge. Despite this potential, reuse remains significantly underutilized. Key to maturing the opportunity is building a greater awareness.  Panelists will address reuse challenges and opportunities, innovative tools and resources available, and strategies to utilize reuse as a vehicle for creativity and sustainability.

Presenter Bios

Kevin R Hydes
Kevin R Hydes, CEO of Integral Group, is a professional engineer and honorary architect in BC. He has been addressing green building issues for 2 decades since first meeting Bob Berkebile on the CK Choi project at UBC. That project opened his mind and curiosity to reuse of building materials, weaving through noteworthy projects such as the Materials Testing Lab and Telus Headquarters in Vancouver and many projects across North America including his own adaptive reuse office in Oakland, California, a low energy LEED Platinum targeted office. Kevin is also founding chair of the Cascadia Chapter and a Cascadia Fellow.

Laura Lesniewski

Laura Lesniewski, AIA is a principal at BNIM. An architect with 20 years of experience, she has spoken nationally on emerging technologies and philosophies in sustainable design, BIM and lean thinking and, most recently, at Brazil’s first Greenbuild in Sao Paulo.  Laura led the design team efforts on the Omega Center for Sustainable Living, which achieved both Living Building and LEED Platinum certification.  She co-authored “Roadmap for Integration” for the AIA’s 2006 Report on Integrated Practice and recently completed FLOW: In Pursuit of a Living Building with Bob Berkebile and Steve McDowell.  Laura is a graduate of MIT and UCBerkeley.


Nathan Benjamin
Nathan Benjamin - LEED AP, Principal + Founder of PlanetReuse & PlanetRestore – a reclaimed construction material broker and consultant predicated on a simple but revolutionary idea: make it easy for people to use reclaimed materials and they’ll do more of it to keep materials out of landfills. He has an Architectural Engineering degree, is on the Building Materials Reuse Association Board and worked on two of the first three “Living” projects. He worked on two of the Reuse Primer’s projects and has presented at the National Demolition Association, Greening the Heartland, GreenTown, past two Greenbuilds, Living Future, and the USGBC Federal Summit.

Liz Ogbu
Liz Ogbu is Associate Design Director at Public Architecture, a nonprofit that mobilizes designers to create positive social change.  Liz directs the public-interest design initiatives, which creatively address critical environmental and social justice issues.  She led development of the Design for Reuse Primer, a USGBC funded e- publication intended to demystify and inspire mainstream material reuse. Liz has written and lectured extensively on sustainable design.  She was a member of the 2010 AIA COTE Top Ten and USGBC Natural Talent Design juries and honored as a "Green Giant" by Steelcase for her work in promoting environmentally and socially sustainable design.

For more info to attend sessions, check out the conference website.

USGBC Webinar - Building & Material Reuse: Understanding the Challenges, Celebrating the Successes, and Navigating the Credits

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April 06, 2011
Session Description:
The LEED credits related to building reuse (Materials & Resources Credits 1.1 and 1.2) and material reuse (Materials & Resources Credits 3.1 and 3.2) are some of the least utilized credits within the rating system. In a time of increasingly limited resources and a growing awareness around sustainable stewardship, however, building and material reuse represents one of the ultimate forms of resource conservation. The reuse of existing built fabric can be economically pragmatic, nurture communities, and provide vision of how to live more sustainably.

Join USGBC for this exciting webinar session, addressing reuse and credit challenges and opportunities, innovative tools and resources available, and strategies to utilize reuse as a vehicle for creativity and sustainability. Upon completion of this webinar session, attendees will gain a greater understanding of how to integrate building and material reuse into their projects and useful strategies for navigating the related LEED credits.

Learning Objectives:
  • Define foundational concepts related to building and material reuse
  • Outline credit intent and techniques that support credit achievement in Materials & Resources Credits 1.1, 1.2, 3.1 and 3.2
  • Discuss, through case studies and anecdotal stories, effective strategies and methods for building and material reuse
  • Identify tools and resources available to support designing with material reuse, material and team logistics, and LEED certification processes  
Speakers:
Moderator:  Sarah Buffaloe, LEED Resource Development, USGBC
Presenter 1: Liz Ogbu, Public Architecture
Presenter 2: Nathan Benjamin, PlanetReuse & PlanetRestore

Live Date: April 7th, 2011: 1:00 – 2:30 PM ET 
 
Continuing Education Hours: This session has been registered for 1.5 hrs with AIA/CES, GBCI
Pricing Information: $60 for members, $75 for non-members

To register: Link to USGBC website




First Living Building Challenge & Reuse Primer Projects - How PlanetReuse Helped - FALL '10 Newsletter

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November 10, 2010
There have been many successful projects that have incorporated reclaimed materials into the buildings.  Recently, an announcement and a publication helped document the process, the successes as well as the challenges.

Announcement:
Cascadia’s first three Living Building Challenge (LBC) Projects were announced recently.  PlanetReuse had the pleasure of working with the design/construction teams on 2 of the 3 projects.  We helped source many materials from areas throughout the United States for the Tyson Living Learning Center in Eureka, MO and the Omega Center for Sustainable Living in Rhinebeck, NY.  For more information on the LBC and the press release describing the details and the teams, visit the LBC site.

Publication:
The 15 diverse projects in the Design for Reuse Primer demonstrate new models of “building green.” Material reuse is always integral to a sustainable vision of how to tread lightly on the earth, be economically pragmatic, and nurture a community. From a school for children with learning differences to a center for holistic living, these case studies are intended to provide insights about the material reuse process in a wide variety of context. By discussing the challenges and demonstrating the benefits of reclaimed materials, they hope to demystify and inspire reuse.

The Design for Reuse Primer publication and website are the latest resources of Public Architecture's ongoing efforts to demystify and promote building material reuse.

There are many great projects that are reviewed in the Primer.  PlanetReuse enjoyed working on two of the fifteen projects:
- Omega Center Center for Sustainable Living
- Operation Comeback 5200 Dauphine Street

Both the LBC projects and the Reuse Primer are great proof that reclaimed materials are successfully being used in commercial and residential projects throughout the United States and that PlanetReuse provides services that are very beneficial in sourcing, documenting and coordinating reclaimed materials.

All of the projects had amazing owners and design teams that really pushed the boundaries in incorporation of reclaimed materials. We take our hats off to you – congratulations!

Design for Reuse Primer Released

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September 22, 2010
Here's a great newly released publication for the material reuse industry.  With a real need to showcase the success stories seen in the increasing number of projects incorporating reclaimed materials as well as discuss the process, this Primer is a must read.

Funded by the US Green Building Council, this free publication shares the stories of fifteen innovative projects, from across the United States and Canada, which have successfully incorporated reused materials.

The 15 diverse projects in the Design for Reuse Primer demonstrate new models of “building green.” Material reuse is always integral to a sustainable vision of how to tread lightly on the earth, be economically pragmatic, and nurture a community. From a school for children with learning differences to a center for holistic living, these case studies are intended to provide insights about the material reuse process in a wide variety of context. By discussing the challenges and demonstrating the benefits of reclaimed materials, they hope to demystify and inspire reuse.

The Design for Reuse Primer publication and website are the latest resources of Public Architecture's ongoing efforts to demystify and promote building material reuse.

Download Public Architecture’s newly released publication, the Design for Reuse Primer

There are many great projects that are reviewed in the Primer.  PlanetReuse enjoyed working on two of the fifteen projects:

- Omega Center Center for Sustainable Living
- Operation Comeback 5200 Dauphine Street

Both projects had amazing owners and design teams that really pushed the boundaries in incorporating reclaimed materials.

Visit www.designforreuse.org to download the primer and learn more.

Conference Update: Living Future, Federal Summit, and Greening the Heartland

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May 27, 2010


This past month has been filled with fantastic sustainability conferences. To start off, PlanetReuse traveled to Seattle, Washington to attend the Cascadia Region Green Building Council Living Future Conference. Keynote speakers included Jason F. McLennan and Dr. John Francis, PhD. CEO of Cascadia GBC, McLennan annnounced during his presentation an interesting challenge to sustainability called the Living City Design Competition. To the most inspiring, informative entries, $125,000 in cash prizes awaits. Dr. Francis then shared with the audience many experiences which helped inspire his book Planetwalker. Dr. Francis helped with the 1971 oil spill in the San Francisco Bay scrubbing petroleum-covered beaches and creatures. Afterwards, he began a pact of no longer using any form of transportation that required petroleum and began traveling the country on-foot which later initiated a vow of silence. A fascinating presentation from an exceptionally interesting person. Many Living Building Challenge projects were reviewed and discussed in a very collaborative format throughout the conference. The Tyson Living Learning Future Project in St. Louis, MO, striving to be one of the first Living Building Challenge-certified projects, shared their successes as well as their struggles in a panel discussion with project Architect Dan Hellmuth with Hellmuth + Bicknese, Neil Myers with Williams Creek Consulting and Nathan Benjamin with PlanetReuse.

Next up was the USGBC Federal Summit which was held in Washington D.C. Among many others, speaking at the conference was the U.S. General Services Administration's Martha N. Johnson who announced the zero environmental footprint target for the U.S. GSA in her presentation. Nathan also got the opportunity to moderate a great panel in a session titled "Building Material Reuse - Successful Models and Future Tools" with Darin Headrick of Greensburg School, Liz Ogbu of Public Architecture, and Ted Huang with Webor Builders. To view their entire Federal Summit presentation, click here. It was great to see the excitement in the over 750 attendees from offices in DC and around the country that can really make change in Federal sustainable policies and procedures.

Then there was Greening the Heartland which took place in Minneapolis, MN. Perfect weather coupled with a great line-up of speakers and activities, this was a great conference. While there, Nathan spread the word about reclaimed materials reuse in his session "Reclaimed Material Reuse: Bridging the Gap Between Want and Need", met many great forward-thinking sustainable firms and companies, and heard a great presentation by keynote speaker Cameron Sinclair of Architecture for Humanity.

During the month of May, there was no shortage of beneficial sustainability conferences occurring around the nation. Despite the recession and budget cuts, it is great to see that sustainability is pushing forward with interest, support, and valuable conversation from coast to coast.

USGBC 2010 Federal Summit: "Leadership in Sustainability from Coast to Coast"

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April 06, 2010


From May 18-19, our nation's capital will be putting their greenest foot forward to host the USGBC Federal Summit which boasts the theme, "Leadership in Sustainability from Coast to Coast." The Federal Summit provides the USGBC, government officials, industry leaders and non-profit community experts the opportunity to all learn from one another, discuss policies, and network with other industry-people passionate about the boom in green building. If you are a government employee, there will be a half-day Forum dedicated to government-focused programming as well. Keynote government speakers will include Director of U.S. General Services Administration Office of Federal High Performance Green Buildings Kevin Kampschroer, U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Manager Richard Kidd, Urban Land Institute Senior Research Fellow Tom Murphy, U.S. General Services Administration Commissioner of Public Buildings Bob Peck, Office of Management and Budget Deputy Associate Administrator for Procurement and Senior Budget Analyst Cynthia Vallina.

Among the many educational sessions to attend is #201 titled, "Building Material Reuse, the Purest Form of Recycling - Successful Models and Future Tools." The focus of this session shall be, "how practitioners and clients have addressed challenges and opportunities around reuse, including how they dealt with government infrastructure to accomplish their goals." The practitioners and clients that have been asked to share their experiences include Liz Ogbu of Public Architecture, Ted Huang of Webcor Builders, Darin Headrick from the Greensburg Schools, and Nathan Benjamin of PlanetReuse.

If you wish to attend the USGBC Federal Summit, early-bird discount rates will be available until May 4th for both government and non-government workers. For more information, click here!

PlanetReuse in Kauffman Foundation's National "Top Start-Up" Competition

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March 19, 2010

PlanetReuse has been nominated by the San Francisco based firm, Public Architecture to be a part of the, "Top Start-Up Companies Outside of Silicon Valley," contest. The contest is being put on by both the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and Bob Cringley. Our objective is to get as many comments and star ratings (or votes) as we can on our nomination before the end of the six week time period. The top 24 companies (the winners of the challenge), will get the opportunity to be a part of a 12-hour reality television series!

Please support PlanetReuse by going to this site and comment on our listing or feel free to give us a five-star rating! Vote here: http://bit.ly/cPeJMp

In thanks for your support, if you comment on our listing, you will also be entered for the chance to win a free one day pass to the Greenbuild 2010 Expo in Chicago, IL on November 17th-19th. If you would like to enter for a chance to win more than once, you can also retweet the following...

"Vote and comment for @PlanetReuser as one of the top start-up companies outside of Silicon Valley in 2010 here! {http://bit.ly/cPeJMp}"

We will be drawing two winners from all of the Kauffman comment-entries and retweets every Friday until we run out of passes so spread the word and best of luck! NOTE: THE FIRST DRAWING WILL TAKE PLACE ON MARCH 26TH, 2010.

Green Heroes Making a difference, in big ways and small. - F'09 Newsletter

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October 28, 2009

These architects, who recently won a prestigious global award for innovation, focus on design that’s good for people and the planet. We’re inspired by their thoughts on how “one percent” can change the world.
Since 2002, Public Architecture has centered on architecture in the service of public interest. That focus bears fruit with designs like the self-contained day labor station, which recently earned the Global Holcim Award. But perhaps the organization’s greatest impact is not a design, but a program to encourage pro bono work.
Their 1% program challenges architecture firms to pledge 1% of billable hours to pro bono work. If everyone jumped on board, that could mean 5,000,000 volunteer hours annually, or as the site states, “the equivalent of 2,500-person firm working full time for the public good.” The program has captured the attention and support of design professionals nationwide. Last year, architects pledged more than 200,000 hours and an estimated $20 million in pro bono services.

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